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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 75 (some duplicates have been removed)
to hire the energy commission. california became the leader in energy efficiency. we put in tax credits and policies of the public utilities commission to favor alternative energy, independent power production. which is obvious today. when they promoted code- generation it was something very novel. 30 years ago. now you have a different name for a period in his third party power production using power in a driving way to recapture the most efficient way. innovation is important. i have to also, every time we heard the word innovation, i have to put a plug in for tradition. i have a very traditional education. i spent a lot of years in silence speaking latin up in the hills, living within the medieval framework. i do respect the past. we study it. if you are grounded in tradition, you feel quite confident in change and innovation. if you are insecure, you are very reluctant to embrace the unknown. i do think we need to in our education and politics, we have to have a new appreciation for our traditions and the patterns that describe our culture and our being as americans. having said all
while reasserting american global energy leadership. even balancing the budget will be easier with this initiative. congress and the administration should begin conversation about a broad-based carbon tax. this would give the right signals on energy sources and use. it could raise money to reduce the deficit, restore our infrastructure, speed and finance conservation. there are a number of other commonsense steps that would make progress on carbon pollution and energy conservation goals more significant. the epa should stop dragging its feet permitting old coal plants to continue to spew forth toxic waste, harming the environment and the health of our citizens. it is past time the clean air act reinforced. make sure there are proper safeguards for the cracking technology. make sure this reservoir of inexpensive gas does not undercut the addition of renewables to our energy portfolio. solar, wind, geothermal. dership on these technologies for a balanced energy portfolio and ultimately to reduce our carbon footprint. at each step, we should be looking to enhance energy conservat
not realize this huge trade deficit we have. half of it historical has been energy products, mostly oil. if you get to the point where you are a self-sufficient producer -- i am glad you said north american energy independent. i always disliked the idea of this national energy independence. if you become energy self- sufficient, you eliminate half the trade deficit. this really changes the balance of payments and the overall shape and direction of the economy. could you speak to that? >> i for started talking about it two years ago. -- i first started talking about it two years ago. i started talking about what was possible with oil. i was a lone wolf in the woods at the time. since then, the bandwagon has loaded up. a lot of other people are saying, yes, it could happen, and it to be very important for america. particularly as it translates from energy to the general economy. there are more pillars' out there, housing, manufacturing -- they depend on recovery. the one that does not is energy, because the international demand is already there. it has been created by china, india. all ar
energy system. by the way, we can create jobs doing that. right now our republican friends, when you talk about want to do entilement reform, it's not entitlement reform. let's be clear. it's massive cuts in social security, medicare, veterans programs, medicaid. >> you know their argument is that you can't just raise taxes. you have to, at some point, you have to get your fiscal house in order and that means cuts to some of these entitlement programs. >> no it does not. when you talk about getting your fiscal house in order, that's correct, but our republican friends forget to mention that at 15.8%, revenue compared to gdp, that is the lowest percentage in 60 years. when clinton gave us a balanced budget, revenue was about 20%. we have one out of four corporations, profitable corporations not paying a nickel in taxes in america. the effective corporate tax rate today is the lowest it's been since 1972. of course republicans want to cut social security, medicare, medicaid. but i think it is time for large corporations who are not paying a nickel in taxes to start paying their fair share.
of the denying quorum and in the case of speaking as long as you cou could, you had to spend time and energy, you had to organize and it was visible before this body. it was visible before the reporters gathered in the balcony. therefore, the american people, long before there was a television camera here, could see what you were doing and the public could provide feedback on that. but now we come to the modern era. from 1970 forward. in which it became popular to start using the objection as an instrument of party warfare, the objection to a final vote. you know, if we turn back before 1970, you had an overlap of the parties of perhaps 30 members. and so if one had used his objection, they'd have a good sense that you would be able to get cloture. furthermore, there was a social contract that you only interrupted the workings of this body on an issue of deep principle. you only blockaded the operations of the senate on an issue of profound concern to your state. not as a routine instrument of party politics. but that's changed over the last 45 years, since 1970 forward, the last 43 years, in whi
the budget deficit, and real focus that we appreciate in northern california on clean energy. for example, moving the state's goal to be 33% clean energy producing. it is my privilege to welcome governor brown to the panel. [applause] >> and to introduce our next panelist, i would like to welcome steve ballmer, senior bp -- vp. >> good morning and thank you. next up is governor hickel lipper -- hickenlooper. he is the serieaal a entreprener each of you have in your respective parts. he became very successful in the brew pub business. he never had a single election not even for stink -- a student council. governor? [applause] in keeping with the discussion, he is keen on innovation and things of that nature. i know that will come out. thank you, governor. >> are we all set? i am from the "mercury news," and we're here because we live in a global cloueconomy. it has altered local economies because so many manufacturing and technology jobs are moving, whether it is a matter of costs for going where the trained work force is. we're fortunate to have to governors here to talk about how that ch
change. >> the solution to climate change is energy policy. the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the down sides, i will be a passionate advocate about this but not based on ideology but based on facts based on science. i hope to sit with all of you and convince you this 6 trillion-dollar market is worth millions of american jobs. >> jennifer: from a political point of view this is a tough issue, the keystone pipeline, and especially with respect to environmental activists. obvious liquory is a big advocate for stopping climate change. what do you think he'll do about keystone? >> i remember he--climate change the copenhagen conference in 2009 senator kerry preceded hillary clinton there, and she proceeded barack obama as one of the areas where he has done significant work on behalf of the administration in this first four years and we'll continue on those interests going forward. it's an interesting thing jennifer in global diplomacy economics is becoming a far more meaningful element of global diplomacy. there is now an assistant secretary of state that focuses on energ
obama is making a moral case on the issue of climate. do you see energy issues, climate issues, being tackled in this next congress? a realistic goal? guest: energy policy broadly absolutely has to be part of the discussion. climate change -- after the severe storms with sandy recently and other harbour tragedies, i think the science is definitely confirming the fact that climate change exists and that we have to do things more responsible about it. my focus is on renewable energy. we don't have oil companies in nevada, but what we do have is an abundance of wind, solar, and geothermal. and i believe that those are alternatives that should be part of our overall energy mix to make us less reliance on fossil fuels and more energy independent in the long term. host: philadelphia, pennsylvania. our next caller is richard, independent line. caller: how are you doing? how are you doing, congressman? the question -- a couple of thoughts. i am interested in what puc is the area that productivity will occur. as far as when you talk about job creation and you coming from nevada, looking at the
. the path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult, but america cannot resist this transition. we must lead it. we cannot cede to other nations the technology that will power new jobs and industry. we must claim its promise. that's how we will maintain our economic vitality and our national presence of forests and waterways, snow-capped peaks, crop lands. and how we will preserve our planet, commanded to our care by god. that is what will lend meaning to the creed our fathers once declared. host: the wall street journal on climate change has this. in flushing, new york, an independent. how are you? caller: good morning. i liked his speech, because it was different from the last one, because it concentrated on how to make america a better country rather than being the military police for the world. he was tempted to talk about north africa and al qaeda and all these things, but he wants to make america stronger. cost is too much. america is not respected, even spending all this money. how to make america big and strong, how to teach our kids, how to respect peop
at limited resources. climate change is a big issue you have been concerned on. the global energy needs are going to increase about 50%, that emissions are going to go up significantly primarily because of china and india and we could do significant harm to the u.s. economy i think by putting additional rules and regulations with very little impact on the global climate. in this tight budget environment with so many competing american priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought into limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy, not help us as a country and not help us globally in perhaps the efforts you might be pursuing. i don't know if you have specific thoughts. >> i do. i have a lot of specific thoughts on it more than we have time now. and i'm not going to abuse that privilege. but i will say this to you, the solution to climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you are expressing concern about, and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues of this.
material cost in the world and lowest energy costs in the world. let's look at how we could make this product back here in america. >> and today the swing once again is made in the usa. just a few years ago when the economy tanked little tykes considered moving manufacturing elsewhere but ultimately they decided to stay receiving close to $4 million in tax incentives for the government. >> we appreciate the state of the federal government but honestly it's not enough to make the difference. it's about the people, it's about the productivity, it's about the longevity. >> they make a large assortment of toys. >> everything little tykes does emulating what parents do in the real world. >> that's why moms are a big part of the research. today they are giving suggestions for the redesign of the cozy coup. >> to use by themselves they can just get in it and walk along. >> i love the floorboards. >> i think toddlers are drawned to the kind of cartoony look that it has. the colors are the iconic thing. >> bye bye. >> more on that on fox and friends later today at 6:30. >> they are adorab
tie sod said it would be nice if the president focused on jobs and the energy crisis in the second term. >> jobs has not gotten lost. energy, the push too renewal energy, immigration reform starting off, of course, with the efforts to reduce gun violence in the country and climate change. climate change part of the renewal energy those are priorities for the president. i think in these first 18 months before people start saying, he is a lame duck. don't pay any attention to what he is doing. the first 18 months, we are going to see some action on those news. lois from new york. >> i am going to turn the phone down. i was listening to you. i was thinking about the things you thought president obama has done so well. i thought he was in my dreams? i just finished saying everything. i think he has done a great job on all of that. i remember, bill, when he first came to. i remember him signing the legislation into law where women could get equal pay for equal work. >> that was the first one, first one he signed. >> i remember when i was in college my
developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> welcome back to the second half of "outfront." we start with stories we care about where we focus with reporting from the front lines. today on the two-year anniversary of the egyptian revolution that ousted hosni mubarak from power, the streets were filled not with peace but with violence. protesters for and against president mohamed morsi clashed with police, at least seven died. morsi did not address the country but tweeted on twitter. he called on people to uphold the noble principles of the revolution. >>> apple is no longer the world's biggest company. the title belongs to exxonmobil. apple shares plummeted on the heels of disappointing earnings resulted and plunged over 12%. apple's market cap first passed exxonmobil on august 9th, 2011. it's been sitting pretty 18 months, seemingly untouchable. tonight it is
that energy in a very constructive way to support incumbents that we have, particularly in those tough districts or states that we can barely hold on to, like a georgia. i mean, that seat could come in play, depending who that nominee is. and the party has to give that some great consideration. >> that substantive critique from you and the different strands of substantive critique about what happened in 2012 and what is wrong inside the party and the structure of the party makes it so remarkable to me that reince priebus was unopposed. i find it astonishing. >> yeah, me too. >> michael steele, msnbc analyst, former chairman of the party, thank you for your time tonight. it's great to see you back. >> all right, rachel. >>> president obama has made his choice to run the s.e.c. the agency that is supposed to police wall street. there are very few people, like maybe zero people who know more about the nominee or the job of the nominee than our special guest tonight, former new york governor and attorney general eliot spitzer is here. yes! stay tuned. ♪ alright, let's go. ♪ shimmy, shi
on the planet. companies like silicon energy in marysville are leading the world. companies are driving innovation in aerospace. at grays harbor, and across-the- board effort led to the reopening of the paper mill last year putting in 175 people back to work, making 100% recycled paper. i have this to say about washington, innovation is in our genes. [applause]we create, we invent, we build. so now we must go forward with both high ambition and the recognition that the power of innovation will fuel the next wave of job growth in washington. make no mistake, our top priority tomorrow and every single day for the next four years is jobs. [applause]we must build a working washington capable of sustained economic leadership in a rapidly changing world. during the campaign, i put out a campaign to put washington back to work. over 100 points of action. focuses on job growth in several clusters, aerospace, life sciences, military, agriculture, information technology, clean energy technology and the maritime trade. these clusters represent both the present and the future drivers of economic dr
for coming. more than 30 years of service. the energy and natural resources committee, we are continuing to san $400 billion a year overseas to buy oil. your colleague senator lugar for a long time told us the only way to beat a cartel, sponsored open fuel standard, basically make a competitive market, the move, automobiles, trucks, weather is electricity or methanol or ethanol or whenever to have a market so that like brazil when you drive up to the pump you have a choice and the price goes down. do you think that is a good idea? with your colleague gone now a huge loss to our country. would you be supportive of a competitive way to break the opec cartel? >> in fracturing that competitive instrument, that is causing that to happen. we had a great fortune of this technology to break through that is going to put this in a completely different position than we have been in the past so i don't think we need -- we have seen the effort to try to develop alternative competitive sources of energy. the problem is they can't be competitive, and particularly because of the new discovery of oil and
developments in the energy industry could lead to high-paying jobs if the government could get out of the way. >>gretchen: varney, a disclaimer here. sorry he put your daughter into that story. secondly, you can always tell when brian has not slept a lot because he actually has more energy. if we do a study on energy -- >>brian: if i would be powered, it would be by natural gas and that could be the future of our country. >> there's a segue. first of all, let's deal with the pipeline. 53 senators including 9 democrats write a letter to the president saying we want that keystone pipeline. please approve it, mr. president. second item, chesapeake energy, huge natural gas producer, opens up a well, one of these fracking wells. opens it up totally to the e.p.a. come on in. have a look at what we're doing and have a look at the aftermath of what we're doing. and if you can find any kind of pollution, okay, we'll hear about it. those are two huge steps forward toward producing a lot more oil, a lot more natural gas, energy independence, jobs in america, a huge step forward in the government gets ou
're on the energy and resources committee also, we are continuing to send almost $400 billion a year overseas to buy oil, and your colleague senator lugar, for a long time has told us that the only way to beat a cartel is through competition and he sponsored what is called an open-fuel standard. to basically make a competitive market to move automobiles, trucks, whether it's electricity or ethanol or whatever, to have a market so that brazil, when you drive up to the pump you have a choice and the price goes down, we think. do you think that's a good idea? and with your colleague gone now and the loss to our country would you be support i have of the competitive way to break the opec cartel? >> i think the technology developments and -- has become that competitive. that is causing that to happen. we had the great fortune of this technology that breakthrough take is going to put us in a different position than we've been in the past. i don't think -- we have seen the effort to try to determine and development alternative competitive because the discovery of oil and gas through shale and shale and thr
has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> coming up, the republican doom and gloom vision of the obama economy just doesn't seem to match reality these days. i'll have the details coming up. >>> and while whistle-blowers come forward to describe the fraud that led to the financial collapse, the department of justice isn't going after wall street's ceos. i'll ask mike papantonio why they're just being let off the hook. you can listen to my radio show on sirius xm radio noon to 3:00 a.m. -- p.m. share your thoughts with us on #edshow. we're coming right back. uhh, it's next month, actually... eddie continues singing: to tickets to... paradiiiiiise! no four. remember? whoooa whooaa whooo! you know ronny, folks who save hundreds of dollars by switching to geico sure are happy. and how happy are they jimmy? happier than eddie money running a tr
, renewable energy, reducing gun violence, and building an economy that last -- get this -- from the middle out. for all these reasons, and many more, it gives me great pleasure to second the nomination of congresswoman debbie wasserman schultz to serve a second term at the helm of the democratic national committee. [applause] >> thank you. the chair now recognizes a member of the dnc spanish cauc caucus, for another session and speech. by the way, i'm not trying to hog the stage. if you want to come up here, feel welcome. >> i am okay. thank you very much. good afternoon, everyone. i am very honored. i come from the great state that gave you the most marvelous president, barack obama. [applause] >> i am also proud to join my fellow democrats nominating congresswoman debbie wasserman schultz for the chair of democratic national committee. while my home is illinois, florida is very close and dear to my heart. my family is smart enough to move out there 20 years ago, so i consider you my congresswoman, too. i've always, i thought of debbie wasserman schultz as my second congressman. it is my
looks at corrections costs. helping america become more energy dependent. and paying for transportation structure, roads, bridges, things like that. also, educating the workforce. let us take a listen to one of the governor's and what he had the say during this state of the state address. this is the governor of new york talking about new york state. >> yes it is hard to reform education. i know the politics of it. i know the problems. i know the issues. but, can you imagining how smart the state would be when we actually educate all of our children to the best of their god-given potential? when every black child and every white child and every orphan child and every other child is educated to their full potential? i know helping the state economy is hard. i know it has been decades of decline. but can you imagine how successful our economy is going to be when that upstate economic engine is running at full speed , and buffalo, and syracuse, and albany. i know women have been treated unfairly for a long time. i know it is cultural. i know it is historical. i know it is difficult. if it
other sub budgets and a permanent energy. domestically, we have a much higher unemployment rate in 1968. we have more poverty absolutely and relatively and 1968. we certainly have more home foreclosures and more consumer debt. of course, 30 million workers are making today less than the workers made in 1968 adjusted for inflation. that is why we're launching this national drive to overpower congress and split the republicans in congress, organized and what the democrats, so tens of billions of dollars are poured into the community, into the long deserved pockets of these people, many of whom have children and they don't have health insurance or paid sick leave or big vacations. but they deserve $10.50 minimum wage, which is what it would be in 1968. no big deal. >> explain how that would work, how does an increase in the minimum wage actually work? >> 1, congress can pass it for all of the states. there is no competition between the states that way in terms of wage levels, no competition between businesses, etc. everyone would have to pay the same minimum wage. the other way is what has
that interview. >> the 49ers say their new stadium will rely on renewable energy. they announced the stadium will create as much energy as it uses. the facility will have solar panels, and possibly charging stations. the stadium is on schedule to open late next year. >>> last night the alma mater of coil incelebrated his success thousands attend the basketball game and during the time out they flexed their arms and kissed their biceps. . >>> the rising star is trying to trademark his famous pose. the patent office received an application. he wants to print the pose on clothing. he has authorized a few small t- shirt companies to use his name and image. >> the search for the next american idol moved to charlotte north carolina last night and the judges saw the good, the bad and the ugly. >> you know how i feel. >> i don't know. >> yeah. >> come on. >> very nice. >> 37 from charlotte were put through but it was the tension between judges that seems to steal the show. >> i'm sorry. i can't help her. maybe i should just get [bleep]. >> every word she said was a yodel. >> the tryouts mo
a nation that is demanding action to create millions of jobs to transform our energy system, to come up with a fair tax proposal so the wealthy and large corporations start paying their fair share. we are not going to be able to do those things and many other things, the things, in fact, that mitch mcconnell and his billionaire friends are worried about, we are not going to be able to do that if we need 60 votes. no, i think what ended up happening is we could only get to the best of my knowledge 47, 48 votes. that was the reality. there were seven or so democrats who chose not to go along with what we call the talking filibuster, which would have meant 51 votes. and that's the story. >> it looks to me like we're reaching the point where the american public is growing more aware of filibuster reform that relates to substantive issues. and this is not a good deal. and it's going to be very interesting to see how this plays out. next week the president is going to be going to nevada to talk about immigration reform. i mean, do you think that we can get immigration reform in this country?
legislation post-columbine did not pass. so the notion that everybody should rely on quote-unquote the energy and force of newtown i would caution not to do that. it's clearly galvanized the country to have an honest conversation and look internally and have a serious conversation, but brady bill and the assault weapon ban were done without, quote-unquote, a columbine or what happened in virginia, any of those incidents. i do believe just in the last four years or i would say the last eight years of politics this, what happened there has made all of us have a discussion that has been sitting on the sidelines or the periphery of politics to be focused and this, obviously, tomorrow morning the president's going to introduce his legislation or his package and decide what legislatively he's going to do, what he's going to do by executive order. but we are at a tipping point to have a discussion that's been postponed, delayed or for whatever reason hasn't happened. but my small kind of flashing yellow light of caution is when you think of the last time we had success which goes back to '93 and '94
to school. nathan. tadpole. and help ensure a constant supply of clean energy. the things we build share one belief. that the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger solutions. powerful answers. verizon. gives you 1% cash back on all purchases, plus a 50% annual bonus. and everyone likes 50% more... [ midwestern/chicago accent ] cheddar! yeah! 50 percent more [yodeling] yodel-ay-ee-oo. 50% more flash. [ southern accent ] 50 percent more taters. that's where tots come from. [ male announcer ] the capital one cash rewards card gives you 1% cash back on every purchase plus a 50% annual bonus on the cash you earn. it's the card for people who like more cash. 50% more spy stuff. what's in your wallet? this car is too small. >>brian: we now know why michelle obama rolled her eyes at house speaker john boehner during monday's inauguration luncheon in the capitol. according to a professional lip reader -- >>gretchen: i knew it was a joke between two guys. >>brian: boehner asked the president if he had a cigarette and then somebody won't let you do it. >>gretchen: president obama, a longtime s
remarkable. you did great things -- your 1/3 renewable energy mandate -- the reform of workers compensation -- the reorganization of state government -- protecting our forests and strengthening our timber industry -- reforming our welfare system -- and launching the nation's first high speed rail system. but, of course, governing never ends. we have promises to keep. and the most important is the one we made to the voters if proposition 30 passed -- that we would guard jealously the money temporarily made available. this means living within our means and not spending what we do not have. fiscal discipline is not the enemy of our good intentions but the basis for realizing them. it is cruel to lead people on by expanding good programs, only to cut them back when the funding disappears. that is not progress -- it is not even progressive. it is illusion. that stop and go, boom and bust, serves no one. we are not going back there. the budget is balanced but great risks and uncertainties lie ahead. the federal government, the courts or changes in the economy all could cost us billions and drive
that his all of the above energy strategy is more than just forgotten campaign rhetoric but an official from the sierra club today told fox radio no, no, this can't be something the president moves forward on, take a listen. >> we simply can't effectively reduce emissions and simultaneously increase investments in dirty oil. >> the point is the president now having to make this decision in the weeks ahead about whether to go forward on the keystone pipeline. that maybe the first test on whether he is going to get serious about climate change in this second term, shep. >> shepard: ed henry on a cold night in washington. ed, thanks. just in to fox news, north korea has just issued a brand new threat regarding secretive nuclear program. the north koreans now warning they will strengthen their military and nuclear defenses in response to new punishments from the united nations. penalties connected to north korea's controversial rocket launch back in december. keep in mind investigators say that launch may have been a cover to test nuclear weapons which could strike the united states. there
my sex drive... but when i started losing energy and became moody... that's when i had an honest conversation with my doctor. we discussed all the symptoms... then he gave me some blood tests. showed it was low t. that's it. it was a number -- not just me. [ male announcer ] today, men with low t have androgel 1.62% (testosterone gel). the #1 prescribed topical testosterone replacement therapy, increases testosterone when used daily. women and children should avoid contact with application sites. discontinue androgel and call your doctor if you see unexpected signs of early puberty in a child, or signs in a woman, which may include changes in body hair or a large increase in acne, possibly due to accidental exposure. men with breast cancer or who have or might have prostate cancer, and women who are or may become pregnant or are breastfeeding, should not use androgel. serious side effects include worsening of an enlarged prostate, possible increased risk of prostate cancer, lower sperm count, swelling of ankles, feet, or body, enlarged or painful breasts, problems breathing durin
started losing energy and became moody... that's when i had an honest conversation with my doctor. we discussed all the symptoms... then he gave me some blood tests. showed it was low t. that's it. it was a number -- not just me. [ male announcer ] today, men with low t have androgel 1.62% (testosterone gel). the #1 prescribed topical testosterone replacement therapy, increases testosterone when used daily. women and children should avoid contact with application sites. discontinue androgel and call your doctor if you see unexpected signs of early puberty in a child, or signs in a woman, which may include changes in body hair or a large increase in acne, possibly due to accidental exposure. men with breast cancer or who have or might have prostate cancer, and women who are or may become pregnant or are breastfeeding, should not use androgel. serious side effects include worsening of an enlarged prostate, possible increased risk of prostate cancer, lower sperm count, swelling of ankles, feet, or body, enlarged or painful breasts, problems breathing during sleep, and blood clots in the
energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> we are back with tonight's "outer circle" where we reach out to sources around the world. we go to south africa where the search is on for thousands of crocodiles near the botswana border. rising floodwaters were threatening about 15,000 crocs on a breeding farm. the owners opened the farm's gates to relieve pressure. more than half the crocs or the loose. maybe that's good because they're not going to be turned into handbags. robyn curnow is following the story. >> reporter: fair to say the people who are trying to round up the crocs are doing it carefully. we understand the recapturing the mostly taking place at nighttime because crocodiles eyes grow red when lights reflected into them. in this largely farming rural area, residents are being warned not to try and capture the crocodiles by grabbing hold of their ta
editorial board said the gun rights lobby has spent considerable time and energy in pursuit of one goal, crippling the atf. the nra has been highly critical of the agency, which sees its mission as preventing violent crime by enforcing federal gun laws and tracing firearms used in crimes. but blaming the nra, does it add up? not exactly. in 2006, republicans in the congress required senate confirmation for the atf director. before that, the president could appoint anyone he wanted. so when president george w. bush nominated michael sullivan, it looked like an easy path, but he couldn't get a vote in a republican-controlled senate. >> did i ever think for a moment my nomination would be held up by a senator from idaho as related to one firearm licensed dealer? no. i didn't. >> idaho senator larry craig along with two other republican, all staunch supporters of the nra, held up sullivan's nomination, but it wasn't the nra's hands at work. it was about one local idaho gun seller's dispute with the atf. even silver himself said the nra didn't derail him. >> i didn't get any sense at all tha
energy. read more about these mysterious forces and what scientists hope to find on our science page. and think you've received bad advice about social security? our benefits guru gets to the bottom of that issue in today's "ask larry" column on our business page. all that and more is on our web site, newshour.pbs.org. gwen? >> ifill: and that's the newshour for tonight. on tuesday, we'll return to the immigration debate with a look at the president's plans for reform. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. we'll see you online, and again here tomorrow evening. thank you, and good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> macarthur foundation. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by america." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york,
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 75 (some duplicates have been removed)